The Panther's Paw

Filed under Features, Student Life

Challenges and Changes for 2019

Ale+Guerrero+%28left%29+and+Mikayla+Morris+%28right%29+thinking+about+their+healthy+New+Year%27s+Resolutions.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Challenges and Changes for 2019

Ale Guerrero (left) and Mikayla Morris (right) thinking about their healthy New Year's Resolutions.

Ale Guerrero (left) and Mikayla Morris (right) thinking about their healthy New Year's Resolutions.

Laura Rowe

Ale Guerrero (left) and Mikayla Morris (right) thinking about their healthy New Year's Resolutions.

Laura Rowe

Laura Rowe

Ale Guerrero (left) and Mikayla Morris (right) thinking about their healthy New Year's Resolutions.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






December, a whole month dedicated to celebrating and getting ready to start a whole new year. 2018 has been a year of ups and downs, and around this time people are starting to make their resolution lists for 2019. 

A New Year’s Resolution is a tradition, most common in the Western Hemisphere, but also found in the Eastern Hemisphere. A person resolves to change an undesired trait or behavior to accomplish a personal goal or otherwise improve their life.

“My resolution is to gain more experience in Jiu Jitsu and to gain a rank,” said Freshman Mikayla Morris. “My resolution is just to become stronger,” stated Ale Guerrero, Freshman. Like most people, they use their New Year’s resolutions to take a chance to become healthier or to focus on the physical.

“My New Year’s Resolution is to become a better person in 2019,”  others like Vincent Bradley, senior, are using their resolutions to start new and become better people in the new year.

But others like Freshman Addison McQuitty don’t even bother trying to keep resolutions in the first place when they know they probably won’t go through with it in the end. “Honestly, I don’t even have any resolutions this year because I know I’ll never be able to keep up with them.” 

Speaking of not keeping up with your resolutions, the success rate of most New Year’s resolutions is actually just as you’d expect them to be, as in most people end up failing and not going through with them. The most common reason for participants failing their New Year’s Resolutions was setting unrealistic goals for themselves (33%), while 33% didn’t even track their progress, and a further 23% just plain forgot about it.

“I just hope that I can improve the quality of my life and maybe the quality of others around me by making my resolutions,” Mikayla Morris, freshman, further stated.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Features

    Spring Hill Varsity Boys Basketball Making History

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Voices of Freedom

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Civil Rights in America

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Stop the Bleed

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Features

    Candy Grams Set to Be Delivered February 14th

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Sweet Gifts for a Sweet Cause

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Goodbye 2018

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Features

    Popular Tech Gifts

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Will 2018 Be Remembered?

  • Challenges and Changes for 2019

    Campus News

    Schedule Swap

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Spring Hill High School
Challenges and Changes for 2019